Portland for Everyone

 

In this episode, we chat with Madeline Kovacs on affordable housing and Portland’s future.

Madeline Kovacs profile photoMadeline Kovacs is the coordinator of Portland for Everyone at 1000 Friends of Oregon. Portland for Everyone is a local coalition of affordable housing providers, community based and environmental organizations, neighborhoods, and local businesses that advocates together for land use decisions that can deliver more abundant, diverse, and affordable housing options for Portlanders.

Prior to coordinating Portland for Everyone, Madeline worked for a decade in the international youth climate movement. This advocacy work included organizing on college campuses, national movement building and communications, and at the 2009 and 2011 United Nations Climate Negotiations. For three years she co-directed Project Survival Media, a global youth journalism network, covering direct actions and producing online media to amplify under-represented voices in the climate conversation.

Madeline’s urban planning and housing work experience includes staffing Orange Splot LLC, a small housing development company and general contractor, and interning for two years at the Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability. She earned her BA in Political Science with a minor in Environmental Studies from Macalester College. Madeline currently serves on the Board of Directors of Proud Ground Community Land Trust.

Show Notes:

Madeline also wished to clarify a few of her points. To say that exclusionary zoning was mapped over American cities beginning in the late 1950’s is a true statement but not the whole story. From 1959 and on was when, in Portland, a lot of single-family zoning was mapped on top of older neighborhoods with more varied housing stock. There were also periods of exclusionary zoning prior to that, namely “redlining” maps of the 1920s through 1930s, and other more overtly racist and classist policies that set aside neighborhoods like Eastmoreland, Alameda, and Irvington etc as “Class A”:

Anita Yap & the Multi-Cultural Collaborative

“There must exist a paradigm, a practical model of social change that includes an understanding of ways to transform consciousness that are linked to efforts to transform structures.” – bell hooks

Anita YapThe MultiCultural Collaborative is a people-of-color-led consulting firm based in Portland, OR empowering communities to build capacity in local governments for equitable public policy decisions and service delivery.

Anita Yap is the founding partner of the MultiCultural Collaborative.

Anita has worked in Oregon’s communities for most of her life in public policy, health equity, community development, land use, transportation, natural resources and housing with government, nonprofit and small business.

Episode 6: What Is Equity Pt. 2

 

Photo credit: Simon Cunningham

Photo credit: Simon Cunningham

“What Is Equity?” Everyone uses this word. What does it mean, how is it used, and where should we be going with it? This is such a big word that we will be exploring this as a special two-parter series. Here we have Part 2.

In the studio for this episode, we have four of the 10-person team at Why Isn’t Anyone Talking About This—Adonia Lugo, Alexis Gabriel, Joy Davis and Steph Routh.

Roll credits:

Today’s show was produced by the whole Team; edited by Eric Klein, and hosted by Adonia, Alexis, Joy, and Steph. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

If you liked this show, help us keep it going by donating via our website, whyisntanyone.com, where you can also leave us comments, questions, and ideas for future topics. Check out the people who have supported us on Crowdrise!

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture.

Episode 2: Planning’s Racism Problem

Does urban planning have a racism problem?

Joy Alise Davis hosts a conversation with Dr. Marisa Zapata and Dr. Lisa Bates about racism, equity, and the role—past, present, and possible—of urban planning.

Roll Credits:

Community is the <3 of resistanceToday’s show was produced by Joy Alise Davis; edited by Eric Klein, and hosted by Joy. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

If you liked this show, help us keep it going by donating via our website, whyisntanyone.com, where you can also leave us comments, questions, and ideas for future topics. Here are the people who have supported us on Crowdrise: Abra, Alan Kessler, Amos, Anonymous, Audrey Addison, Breesa Culver, Caroline and Paul Z, Chris Smith, CJ Walker, Cory, Dan Gebhart, fool, Heidi Guenin, K. Bott, Kim Harrison, Matt Luce, Michael Andersen, Peter W, Pogo Crowe, Starlene Rankin, Steph Routh, Stephanie Noll, Steve Bozzone, Susan Peithman, The Sprocket Podcast, Thomas Ngo, and Vivian Satterfield.

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture.