Gabby Smashes!

Gabby Smashes!

Gabby Antonion Smashes...

In this episode, Alexis and Steph talk with Dawn Jones Redstone and Luann Algoso about how Gabby Antonio has been smashing the Imperialist, White Supremacist, Capitalist Patriarchy.

Dawn Jones Redstone is an award-winning gay, Latinx filmmaker best known as director and co-writer of the acclaimed, dramatic short film, Sista in the Brotherhood. Her short film We Have Our Ways just won Best Oregon Short Film at Portland International Film Festival And was named a “favorite Portland Film,” by the Willamette Week. Dawn is the recipient of the MRG Foundation’s 2016 Lilla Jewel Award and was named a Woman of Vision by the Oregon Daily Journal of Commerce. She is committed to creating films that help balance the media representation of women and people of color both in front of and behind the camera. Dawn has been working in the nonprofit world for 14 years as an employee, board member and a subcontractor and is ready to mine the wealth of comedy, this sector has to offer!

Luann Algoso is a Portland, Oregon-based writer, creative activator, cultural worker, and strategic communications specialist. In 2015, she received her Master of Arts degree in Conflict Resolution at Portland State University with the thesis titled, “Comedy as a Platform for Marginalized Voices: Asian American Women and the Disoriented Comedy Showcase”. She is a 2017 recipient of the Golden Spot Award Residency, a curated artist in residency program with Caldera Arts. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram at @luann_algoso.

Note: This episode was recorded in early May 2018.

The Minidoka Swing Band

The Minidoka Swing BandThe Portland-based Minidoka Swing Band was formed in September 2007, as a tribute to Japanese Americans interned during World War II and to highlight the music popular in the Internment Camps. In this episode, Alexis and Steph interview four members of the band.

Doug Katagiri is from Portland, Oregon. His parents and grandparents were all imprisoned in camps during World War II. His participation in the Minidoka Swing Band is a tribute to honor all those who had to endure the camp experience and survive the irreversible disruption of their lives.

He has played guitar since the folk and garage band craze of the 1960s, although he was only introduced to big band music when Robbie Tsuboi recruited him to be one of the original members of the Minidoka Swing Band. He currently lives in Beaverton, Oregon, works as a graphic designer at the Oregon Zoo, plays rock and blues in several “geezer” bands, drums in an Irish bagpipe band, and sings in an a cappella quartet.

While most people from Washington/Oregon people were interned in Minidoka, Larry Nobori’s family was interned in Jerome Ark for 6-8 months during WWII. As an adult, he has returned to his roots as a Japanese American through his role as the director and charter member of the Minidoka Swing Band. Along with his brother, George, he has been able to relive the music of the Internment Camps by way of George Yoshida’s book “Reminiscing In Swingtime.” In addition, he is working with former state poet laureate, Lawson Inada, with a program called “Sentimental Journey”, in which they infuse jazz with poetry to tell the story of internment. Lastly, he is producing a new CD featuring Lawson Inada and his poetry. It will be called “Nihon-machi” or Japanese market place. It also features the band, vocal soloist, and Lawson’s poetry.

Born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1938 to a Japanese American father and Chinese American mother, Nola Bogle grew up in a musical environment. Her parents, Don and Pil Sugai, loved music from Andy Russell, Duke Ellington, Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday and Billy Eckstine. During World War II she and her family were interned at Minidoka, Idaho. There she remembers hearing big bands and singers performing over the radio. Throughout her life she has stayed connected to music.

Nola moved to Portland, OR in 1964, where she met, worked for, and subsequently married Sidney Porter. Porter was a pianist who owned his own jazz club, called Sidney’s. After Sidney’s death in 1970, she continued to work in music. She finally retired in 1973, returning to office work and raising her two daughters, Ericka and Tiffany. In 1976 she met, and later married Dick Bogle, then the first African American Television News anchor. They were married for 33 years, and their blended family boasts 5 children, 13 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren.

In 1999, she met Portland jazz pianist Darrell Grant, then Associate Professor of Jazz Studies at Portland State University, and with him recorded her first CD. In 2008, Robbie Tsuboi asked her to join the Minidoka Swing Band as one of their vocalists. Now in 2018, she has equated over five decades of entertaining on stage with some time outs for marriage and raising her two beautiful daughters. And, she’s still at it!!

Laura Baxter was asked by founder of the Minidoka Swing Band, to Robbie Tsuboi to take over the management of the band when she became ill with cancer. Unfortunately, Robbie succumbed to the cancer shortly thereafter in 2009. Laura’s husband, son, and brother-in-law are all members of the band, so it was a natural fit with family members already involved.

Her experience of working as an Administrative Assistant and in accounts receivable with the Hillsboro Chamber of Commerce and her years as the Volunteer Manager of the Oregon International Air Show is a great help with the position. Laura loves her involvement with the Japanese American community and the history of Japanese American WWII Internment.

Roll credits:

Today’s show was produced by Steph Routh and Alexis Gabriel. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

If you liked this show, help us keep it going by donating via our website, whyisntanyone.com, where you can also leave us comments, questions, and ideas for future topics. Check out the people who have supported us on Crowdrise!

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture. We record from the delightful Airstream-now-studio, StreamPDX.

Tamika Butler & Keyonda McQuarters

Tamika, Keyonda, Alexis, Steph, and Cait's desk plant

How do self-policing, parenting, Blackness, gender justice, and transportation and land use advocacy intersect in everyday life? And what is your homework? Listen in on our latest episode to learn from Tamika Butler and Keyonda McQuarters.

Tamika Butler is the Executive Director of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Land Trust. In her current role she grows healthier, safer, and stronger communities through the creation of urban parks and community gardens—addressing the critical lack of green and recreational spaces in greater Los Angeles’ underserved neighborhoods. Prior to this, Butler was the the executive director of the Los Angeles Bicycle Coalition, bringing energy and passion to the quest for better bicycle access.

Keyonda McQuarters stepped up as the Portland Chapter’s admin of Black Girls Do Bike over a year ago and has been leading two rides on average per week ever since. Black Girls Do Bike is a national organization with over 75 local chapters. The organization was created to champion efforts introducing the joy of cycling to all women, but especially black women and girls.

Youth Organizing for Environmental Justice

YEJA logo

YEJA logo by youth organizer Quandre Brown

Why is youth organizing important, and what are the unique qualities of youth organizing? In this episode, we talked with Jennifer Phung, a community organizer working with Youth Environmental Justice Alliance (YEJA) and OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon.

Jennifer Phung is a community organizer born and raised in Oakland, California, and leads OPAL’s multi-racial youth organizing program, Youth Environmental Justice Alliance (YEJA). Jennifer’s organizing background comes from a range of experiences in labor, tenant organizing, and youth organizing. YEJA develops youth leaders through political education, campaign organizing, and skill-building to address issues of Environmental Justice. Jennifer works with YEJA to create a space for youth to gain skills to take collective action on issues affecting their communities.

Vivian Satterfield is second-generation bilingual Chinese American, born and raised in inner city Chicago. She believes in the power of organizing, the efficacy of people-centered public policy, and the therapeutic benefits of a long bike ride. Vivian is currently the Deputy Director at OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon, where she’s helped bring grassroots-led campaigns and coalition efforts around issues such as lifting Oregon’s 17-year long ban on inclusionary zoning, and the extensions of transfer times on TriMet, to success.

Two Spirit Movement and Environmental Protection

Two Spirit Movement and Environmental Protection


What does it mean to be Two Spirit, and what has the Two Spirit movement’s role been in protection of basic rights. We spoke with Candi Brings Plenty and Court Morse about their path, which led them to Standing Rock as water protectors.

Candi Brings PlentyCandi Brings Plenty, Oglala Lakota Sioux is a National Queer Cysgender Indiginous Woman and has worked for over two decades for not just Indigenous people, but for everyone in community to receive medicine. Candi is completing her Masters in Public Health Administration, and has a graduate certificate in Non Profit management. On levels related to gender, race, sexual orientation, and economic background, she is unmatched in her passion and strength to push every issue forward. Candi brings Plenty is a single mother of two beautiful daughters, an educator and community health worker, and spiritual practitioner.

20170628_175820

 

Court Morse has over ten years of organizing and community action experience. Court grew up in Wisconsin and came out to Oregon to attend Portland State University. There she worked with the Oregon Student Association as student body president. She has had the opportunity since to run numerous political and human rights campaigns focusing on the environment, higher education, racial and LGBT justice, and immigrant/refugee rights, primarily in Oregon. Court is enrolled with the Sault Ste. Marie tribe of Chippewa Indians, Ojibwe, Anishinaabe and goes by she or they pronouns. She attended Oceti Sakowin on four occasions with the last trip a permanent move to camp prior to eviction. She toured with the Two Spirit Nation to tell the story of Standing Rock and to support other Two-Spirit Queer Indigenous warriors, elders and youth in their work. She’s proud to stand by Candi as her close friend and support her vision for our people.

Race/Ethnicity & Neighborhood Housing Choice


How does race factor into the choices and opportunities involved in homeownership? We explored the answer to this question and many more with researcher C. Aujean Lee from Los Angeles.

C. Aujean Lee profile photoC. Aujean Lee is a doctoral candidate at UCLA in the Department of Urban Planning. She received her Master’s of Urban Planning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her B.A. from UCLA in Psychology and Asian American Studies. Her research examines the racial wealth gap with a focus on homeownership and the role of ethnic- and neighborhood-based institutions.

Roll credits: 

Today’s show was produced by Steph Routh and Alexis Gabriel. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture. We record from the delightful Airstream-now-studio, StreamPDX.

On Supremacy in Oregon


On April 29th, over 100 White people came to 82nd Ave in Portland, Oregon, chanting “Go back to where you come from” and other racist and anti-immigrant sentiments. A portion of 82nd Avenue sits within the Jade District, one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Oregon state.

Where did this come from, and what does this say about our region?

Zahir Janmohamad profile photo
Zahir Janmohamed
is the Policy Director for APANO, the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon. He is also the co-host of Racist Sandwich, a podcast about race and food.


Scot Nakagawa
has spent the last four decades as a pro-democracy activist, addressing issues of race and gender inequity, religious bigotry, and anti-LGBTQ oppression through community-based campaigns, cultural organizing, popular education, writing, and public policy advocacy.

Scot Nakagawa profile photoScot has worked with numerous organizations and movements over the years, having served as Fight the Right Organizer and Field Director of the National LGBTQ Task Force; Education Co-Coordinator of the Highlander Research and Education Center; Associate Director of the Western Prison Project (Partnership for Safety and Justice); and Executive Director of the MRG Foundation of Oregon, and of the Social Justice Fund, NW.

Scot’s primary contribution has been to the fight against vigilante white supremacist groups, white nationalism, Nativism, and authoritarian evangelical political movements. In this work, he has served as a strategist, organizer, and social movement analyst. Scot is busy at work on a number of projects, including writing a playbook for anti-authoritarians and a primer on race and power. His writings have been included in Race, Gender, and Class in the United States: An Integrated Study, 9th EditionKilling Trayvons: An Anthology of American Violence; and Eyes Right!: Challenging the Right Wing Backlash. Scot is a former Alston/Bannerman Fellow, and the recipient of the 2017 Association of Asian American Studies Community Leader Award.

Find him on Facebook.

Roll credits: 

Today’s show was produced by Steph Routh and Alexis Gabriel. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

If you liked this show, help us keep it going by donating via our website, whyisntanyone.com, where you can also leave us comments, questions, and ideas for future topics. Check out the people who have supported us on Crowdrise!

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture. We record from the delightful Airstream-now-studio, StreamPDX.

The Portland People’s Climate Movement March

Vivian Satterfield photoIn this episode, we will be talking with Vivian Satterfield with OPAL about the Portland People’s Climate Movement March.

Vivian is second-generation bilingual Chinese American, born and raised in inner city Chicago. She believes in the power of organizing, the efficacy of people-centered public policy, and the therapeutic benefits of a long bike ride. Vivian is currently the Deputy Director at OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon, where she’s helped bring grassroots-led campaigns and coalition efforts around issues such as lifting Oregon’s 17-year long ban on inclusionary zoning, and the extensions of transfer times on TriMet, to success.

Portland People's Climate Movement March, April 29th, 2017 12:00pm-5:00pm at Dawson Park

Roll credits: 

Today’s show was edited by Steph Routh with help from Alexis Gabriel. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

If you liked this show, help us keep it going by donating via our website, whyisntanyone.com, where you can also leave us comments, questions, and ideas for future topics. Check out the people who have supported us on Crowdrise!

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture. We record from the delightful Airstream-now-studio, StreamPDX.

Displacement and Wage Theft: An Interview with NMASS

The NMASS crew with co-hosts Leslie and Steph in front of the Stream.The National Mobilization Against Sweatshops (NMASS) is a multi-trade, multi-ethnic workers center where working people unite across industry, race, nationality and gender to fight for the changes needed in workplaces, communities and lives.

JoAnn Lum, Karah Newton, and Kai Wen Yang from NMASS joined us from their headquarters in New York City to discuss wage theft, displacement, and their “ambitious” plans for a just future.

Roll credits: 

Today’s show was produced by Leslie Lum and edited by Steph Routh. Music is by Breuss Arrizabalaga Quintet. You can find us on our Facebook page and on Twitter @whyisntanyone.

If you liked this show, help us keep it going by donating via our website, whyisntanyone.com, where you can also leave us comments, questions, and ideas for future topics. Check out the people who have supported us on Crowdrise!

We are a project of Umbrella, a Portland-based nonprofit that encourages community-based street culture. We record from the delightful Airstream-now-studio, StreamPDX.

Anita Yap & the Multi-Cultural Collaborative

“There must exist a paradigm, a practical model of social change that includes an understanding of ways to transform consciousness that are linked to efforts to transform structures.” – bell hooks

Anita YapThe MultiCultural Collaborative is a people-of-color-led consulting firm based in Portland, OR empowering communities to build capacity in local governments for equitable public policy decisions and service delivery.

Anita Yap is the founding partner of the MultiCultural Collaborative.

Anita has worked in Oregon’s communities for most of her life in public policy, health equity, community development, land use, transportation, natural resources and housing with government, nonprofit and small business.